Monday, May 7, 2012

Debo's Triple Nut Butter


The almond is a native to the Mediterranean climate region of the Middle East, eastward as far as the Indus. It was spread by humans in ancient times along the shores of the Mediterranean into northern Africa and southern Europe and more recently transported to other parts of the world, notably California, United States. 

 
 
The wild form of domesticated almond grows in parts of the Levant; almonds must first have been taken into cultivation in this region. The fruit of the wild forms contains the glycoside amygdalin, "which becomes transformed into deadly prussic acid (hydrogen cyanide) after crushing, chewing, or any other injury to the seed."

However, domesticated almonds are not toxic; Jared Diamond argues that a common genetic mutation causes an absence of glycoside amygdalin, and this mutant was grown by early farmers, "at first unintentionally in the garbage heaps, and later intentionally in their orchards". Zohary and Hopf believe that almonds were one of the earliest domesticated fruit trees due to "the ability of the grower to raise attractive almonds from seed. Thus, in spite of the fact that this plant does not lend itself to propagation from suckers or from cuttings, it could have been domesticated even before the introduction of grafting". Domesticated almonds appear in the Early Bronze Age (3000–2000 BC) of the Near East, or possibly a little earlier. A well-known archaeological example of the almond is the fruit found in Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt (c. 1325 BC), probably imported from the Levant. Of the European countries that the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh reported as cultivating almonds, Germany is the northernmost, though the domesticated form can be found as far north as Iceland.

The coffee really brings the nutty flavor out.

Debo's Triple Nut Butter
Copyright 2012, Debo, Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
1 (10 oz) package whole cashews
1 (16 oz) dry roasted peanuts
1 (12 oz) package whole almonds
1 heaping teaspoon dry coffee

Directions:
Place all ingredients in blender. Blend on high, until desire consistency. Enjoy!

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20 comments:

  1. Ooh, how lovely with the coffee added!

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  2. I haven't made like this looks wonderful

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  3. Anything Nutty is my type of snack and you have added coffee, too.

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  4. I love the combination of nuts and coffee. What a wonderful idea to combine them in a nut butter!

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  5. This looks great with the added coffee. My husband would love it!

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  6. Supreme! I love how you slipped in a pinch of coffee too! This would be a great addition to so many recipes!

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  7. The coffee is a really interesting touch--I love nut butters, and this one looks delicious. I'll bet the variety of nuts kicks this one up a notch.

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  8. I agree with a lot of the comments, that touch of dry coffee is very cool!

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  9. Wow... that is a great combo of nuts!! I am so curious what the coffee does to the flavor... gotta try this. :)

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  10. Why have one nut if you can have three! :D

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  11. Love the addition of coffee ! This is the first time that I've seen recipe of 3 nut butter ! Yummy !

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  12. Great combination. Sounds great!

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  13. I haven't had nut butter in ages. Love it.

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  14. Triple nut butter? This is like, the KING of nut butters!

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  15. Hi Christine, I made this last night. My family loved it. My husband and kids were all doing a happy dance.

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  16. I don't think I can get this triple Nut Butter here, sounds amazing!

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  17. One think I always have on hand for snacking or baking is nuts. This nut butter is very unique and I love the touch of coffee in there, I will need to try this!

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  18. I never considered adding coffee to nuts. Thanks for the tip and will give this a try.

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  19. I never thought of adding coffee to nuts. Thanks for the tip I will definitely give this a try.

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  20. I never considered adding coffee to nuts. Thanks for the tip and will give this a try.

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