Sunday, November 13, 2011

Beer Battered Fried Shrimp


Indonesians and others have farmed shrimp for centuries, using traditional low-density methods. Indonesian brackish water ponds, called tambaks, can be traced back as far as the 15th century. They used small scale ponds for monoculture or polycultured with other species, such as milkfish, or in rotation with rice, using the rice paddies for shrimp cultures during the dry season, when no rice could be grown. Such cultures often were in coastal areas or on river banks. Mangrove areas were favored because of their abundant natural shrimp. Wild juvenile shrimp were trapped in ponds and reared on naturally occurring organisms in the water until they reached the desired size for harvesting.

Industrial shrimp farming can be traced to the 1930s, when Japanese agrarians spawned and cultivated Kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) for the first time. By the 1960s, a small industry had developed in Japan. Commercial shrimp farming began to grow rapidly in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Technological advances led to more intensive forms of farming, and growing market demand led to worldwide proliferation of shrimp farms, concentrated in tropical and subtropical regions. Growing consumer demand in the early 1980s coincided with faltering wild catches, creating a booming industry. Taiwan was an early adopter and a major producer in the 1980s; its production collapsed beginning in 1988 due to poor management practices and disease. In Thailand, large-scale production expanded rapidly from 1985. In South America, Ecuador pioneered shrimp farming, where it expanded dramatically from 1978. Brazil had been active in shrimp farming since 1974, but trade boomed there only in the 1990s, making the country a major producer within a few years. Today, there are marine shrimp farms in over fifty countries.

Shrimp mature and breed only in a marine habitat. The females lay 50,000 to 1 million eggs, which hatch after some 24 hours into tiny nauplii. These nauplii feed on yolk reserves within their bodies, and then metamorphose into zoeae. Shrimp in this second larval stage feed in the wild on algae, and after a few days, morph again into myses. The myses look akin to tiny shrimp, and feed on algae and zooplankton. After another three to four days, they metamorphose a final time into postlarvae: young shrimp that have adult characteristics. The whole process takes about 12 days from hatching. In the wild, postlarvae then migrate into estuaries, which are rich in nutrients and low in salinity. They migrate back into open waters when they mature. Adult shrimp are benthic animals living primarily on the sea bottom.
By http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrimp_farm#History_and_geography

 

Beer Battered Fried Shrimp
Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
50 large shrimp
1 tablespoon pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 (12 oz) bottle beer
1 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
seafood seasoning, to taste (I used creole seasoning)
vegetable oil, for frying
2 1/2 cups baking mix

Directions:
Heat oil to 350. In large bowl, add baking mix, salt, pepper, garlic powder and beer. Using whisk, mix well. Season shrimp with seafood seasoning. Dip shrimp into batter, then add shrimp to hot oil. Fry shrimp for 4 minutes. Remove shrimp to paper towels, to drain. Enjoy!

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30 comments:

  1. Mmmmmm...your shrimp sound excellent! I'd hate to share these :)

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  2. I can imagine the slight crunch and the flavor of the beer batter with these fried shrimp, delicious!

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  3. Hi Christine,

    I adore shrimp, and your Beer Battered Shrimp looks sooo good. I'm wondering how many adults your recipe will serve? Also, is there a a particular kind of beer that you recommend?

    Thanks,
    Alaiyo

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  4. Beer batter recommend it to everyone.I also put a little bit of baking powder in it;)

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  5. Hi Alaiyo,

    This recipe will serve 4. Shiner Bock beer is good. Use your favorite beer. Don't cook with beer that you wouldn't drink. Hope this helps you. Thank you!

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  6. This looks sooooo good Christine! I love shrimp but don't get them often cause they are so darned expensive. But this goes to the top of the list for what to make next time I get any!

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  7. I love your food history, Christine. And I have to admit, fried shrimp was my earliest memory of any "gourmet" food! (Still love it!)

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  8. My favourite seafood! Perfectly fried too! Yum!

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  9. Hi Janet,

    Like you, I don't buy shrimp often cuz they are expensive, but I got a good deal at Aldi, so decided to buy the shrimp. Love shrimp.

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  10. Hi Rosemary,

    I love food history too. Thank you!

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  11. Wow! beer batter and seafood... great research too. :)

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  12. I do love a good beer batter. Though I think a good ale is best so I can drink some as well. :)

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  13. Yum! I haven't had fried shrimp in a while. I tend to choose grilled or boiled, but I have to admit, fried IS the best way to eat shrimp.

    Those sort of ponds are natural along the Texas coastline, and I used to stop and snag shrimp and crab in them when I lived in Texas.

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  14. I always love to read your food history lessons. There's so much more to our recipes and the food we eat then we know unless we do the research like you do. The shrimp looks perfect. I'm going to save this for the next Sunday afternoon football game.

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  15. Yummmmm. My husband would love these!

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  16. These sound amazing! Beer battered anything is good for me! Crazy it only takes 12 days, always love the info you provide!

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  17. This is the sort of food that is SO bad for you--and yet I love it SO much! Thanks for sharing your recipe!

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  18. Shrimp are something I can never pass up! Beer battered does sound like a tasty way to prepare them-yum!

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  19. Yummy! These shrimps look so delicious. I love fried food, and who doesn't!?! =]

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  20. Great batter! These look fantastic!

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  21. A terrific recipe, Christine. It's amazing that humans can pretty much farm anything....

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  22. Mmmmm... The batter sounds perfect. I love beer batter anything! ;)

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  23. WOW! That's a lot of eggs from one shrimpie! LOL What's the baking mix?

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  24. Hi Jennifer,

    The baking mix is an all purpose baking mix that I bought from Aldi. You can use Bisquick.

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  25. Ohhhh...I love this dish, Christine! Yummy! We call the Filipino version of this "Nilasing na Hipon" which means "drunken shrimps". :)

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  26. Hi Tina,

    Drunken shrimp... lol. I love it.

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  27. Thank you for all the wonderful comments. You and your comments make me happy.

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  28. Mmmm....so so so gooood, Christine! Sounds like a perfect treat to me. I love shrimp!

    xoxo,
    Tammy

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