Monday, August 1, 2011

Egg Salad Sandwich

Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

 
Dill is a herb which has a long history of use both medicinally and culinary, its associations with both witchcraft and the bible indicate its diversity of use. Dill (Anethum graveolens), a member of the Umbelliferae plant family, derives its name from the Norse dilla meaning to soothe or to lull. It was a herb which the ancient Egyptians used for medicinal purposes and it is recorded in the Ebers Papyrus as an ingredient for a pain killing mixture of that time.

Both the ancient Romans and the Greeks were users of dill, the Romans called it anethum which later became known as anise. The Greeks believed dill helped with sleep and hiccups. Dill also receives a mention in the Bible with reference to its value as a tax payment. In Scandinavia and Germany dill was used in cooking in fish and cucumber and its seeds were baked in bread.

Throughout the Middle Ages, dill was used as a protection against witches. Magically, dill was used in spells and used to promote romance, when combined with wine. The Pioneer settlers of North America gave their children dill seed to chew throughout long sermons in church, where dill earned the nickname
meetin' seed.

In both the West and the East, dill was used as a digestive aid for help with wind, colic and indigestion and is still current in the British Herbal Pharmacopoeia for this use. It was especially known for its use with children and babies; dilly pillows, made from lavender and dill, helped to lull European children to sleep with their fragrance. Today, dill is used in grippe water for babies.

Native to the Mediterranean region, dill is an annual or biennial herb which grows up to three feet high. It has small, aromatic yellow flowers which are arranged in clusters; it blooms in midsummer. Dill's feathery leaves are also aromatic and are blue green in color. It usually has one main stem which is also blue green. Dill's seeds are aromatic and contain mineral salts, calcium, silicic acid and phosphorus. Dill is now cultivated worldwide.

Uses of Dill

Culinary ... the leaf, seed, and flower are used to flavor soups, meat and fish dishes, cakes and breads; known for its use in pickles and condiments.

Cosmetic... the seeds of dill are chewed to freshen breath; used as a fragrance component in perfumes, soaps and detergents.

Aromatic... dill is used in aromatherapy as an essential oil, useful for help with a number of ailments, especially digestive difficulties, but also used with nursing mothers to promote the flow of milk.

Medicinal... dill is rich in mineral salts and can help with a salt-free diet. Dill water is a popular pharmaceutical digestive preparation.
By http://www.suite101.com/content/a-brief-guide-to-dill-a73252

 
Egg Salad Sandwich
Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
4 hard boiled eggs
salt and pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon dill
12 grain bread, or your favorite bread
light mayo, to taste

Directions:
Cut hard boiled eggs in halve, place yolks in a bowl. Using a fork, mash egg yolks. Add light mayo, dill, salt and pepper, mix well. Dice your egg whites. Fold dice egg whites into yolk mixture. Serve egg salad on bread. Enjoy!


41 comments:

  1. Hey y'all,

    If you leave a comment and ask me a question, please come back to get your answer. I will answer all questions. I read all comments and emails.

    Thanks and hope y'all have a great week.

    Christine

    ReplyDelete
  2. I used to have egg salad sandwich in New York but I didn't know how to make it. I'm going to make this for my daughter, today I bought a loaf of wholegrain bread from NaturaSì, perfect for it. What is dill in Italian? Following you from Rome!

    ReplyDelete
  3. It's amazing how so many culinary herbs have medicinal uses too. I always put dill in my egg salad.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've never used dill in an egg sandwich. I'll have to try that next time. I did however make a dill ranch dip last week that disappeared in no time at all. So, I bet we'd like it with the eggs. thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Egg salad was the classic trip sandwich filling when I was a child. My mom made up a batch and put it in the cooler so that we could eat it half way to our destination. Brings back memories.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Ciccia,

    Your question: What is dill in Italian?
    Answer: Italian: Aneto

    Thanks for stopping by.

    ReplyDelete
  7. My favorite sandwich, will have to try this next time. andi

    ReplyDelete
  8. Awesome info, thanks for sharing! I love egg salad sandwich, great recipe for sure!

    ReplyDelete
  9. wow that looks healthy and yumm!!!!can you link to the event in my blog?

    EVent-Quick & Easy Recipes-FBN
    Event-Healthy Snacks-GFR

    ReplyDelete
  10. Egg salad is a classic! My husband loves them, and I make them for him often. I am not a fan of eggs or mayo, so I won't touch it. But interesting reading about it - thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love dill. I've planted dill in my backyard and uses them often on fish. Very creative way to use dill with egg sandwich. Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  12. One of my favorite sandwiches... Your version sounds very yummy, Christine!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love food history! I'll remember reading this as I bring some more dill in from my garden. Please stop by Sprigs of Rosemary to pick up an award -- and pass it on if you'd like! You have a very interesting blog!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I've never used dill in an egg salad sandwich - I bet it's great! I got a chuckle that it was used to ward off witches! All I could see was folks running around with dill necklaces!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Rosemary, thank you so much! I'm very happy to receive the award. Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I've never used dill on egg salad and I love egg salad. Thanks for the idea!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Ann, I also giggle when I saw that.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love dill! Thanks for sharing all those facts about dill! The witches thingy was quite funny! hehehe

    ReplyDelete
  19. Egg salad sandwiches are a comfort food to me and remind me of childhood lunches. The addition of dill sounds good-thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  20. There's nothing quite like a fantastic egg salad sandwich. I think I'm going to have to encourage myself to like dill as it has far too many good qualities! But in all honesty a good egg sandwich is only complete for me with a handful of cress added.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I never knew that dill was so helpful medicinally! This egg salad sounds so delicious =)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Sometimes it's the simplest meals that are the most satisfying. Thank you for the reminder.

    ReplyDelete
  23. That looks and sounds good, thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Next time I will add dill to mine. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Had egg salad sandwiches for lunch, although without the history lesson, which is fascinating. I know Adam will be happy to add dill to the garlic in his armory of defense against vampires, witches and the other inhabitants of his horror movie fascination...

    ReplyDelete
  26. thank you for such wondeful info on dill, love learning about the herbs we use in our kitchen!!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Wow! I never knew so much about Dill. My little Dill plant has a lot to live up to, I guess! Thanks so much for the wonderful recipe and cool history. :)

    ReplyDelete
  28. ANETO!!!Yes, now I remember. Thank you Christine!

    ReplyDelete
  29. The definition o comfort food. I have never used dill

    ReplyDelete
  30. I always put fresh dill in my egg salad - and chopped olives! It just brightens the eggs!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Love egg sandwiches, this looks delicious! :)

    ReplyDelete
  32. Easy to make, delicious in taste!

    ReplyDelete
  33. I adore egg salad sandwiches and really love your idea of putting dill in the recipe. If my waistline was more accommodating I'd eat egg salad everyday for lunch :)

    Holly

    ReplyDelete
  34. I haven't had one of these in YEARS!

    ReplyDelete
  35. We call dill anis. The dried one is used for soups, haven't seen the normal one though.

    But that's one good sandwich, breakfast or merienda, I'll surely love it.

    ReplyDelete
  36. This is my all time favorite sandwich!!! My mom always made the perfect egg salad sandwich, but it could have been made with some love too:-) Hugs, Terra

    ReplyDelete
  37. While I never developed a taste for dill pickles, dill does add a lovely element to egg salad.

    ReplyDelete
  38. I would never have thought to put dill in my egg salad sandwich but I just may give it a try.

    ReplyDelete

Why not leave a comment or a suggestion? Be the first to leave a comment.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...