Monday, July 25, 2011

Sausage Balls With Dip

Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

 
Paprika is a spice that is often overlooked by cooks. The only time we think of paprika is when we make potato salad or chicken, using the spice for color to make drab dishes look alive. But paprika is an interesting spice that can be used for much more than a coloring agent.

Paprika is a red powder that is made from grinding the dried pods of mild varieties of the pepper plant known as (Capsicum annuum L.) The pepper plants used to make this spice range from the sweet Bell pepper to the milder chili peppers. The Paprika peppers originally grown were hot. Over time, they have evolved to the milder varieties. In Hungary there are six classes or types of paprika ranging from delicate to hot. The peppers also range in size and shape depending on where they are grown . Some are grown in Spain, Hungary, California and other parts of the U.S. The most commonly produced paprika is made from the sweet red pepper also called the tomato pepper.

Paprika powder ranges from bright red to brown. Its flavor ranges from sweet and mild to more pungent and hot, depending on the type of pepper used in processing. Sweet paprika is the standard. It is mild in flavor. The hot paprika gives your taste buds a jolt. Both varieties are generally carried in most supermarkets. If you cannot find hot paprika in your local supermarket try gourmet stores.

Paprika has been traditionally associated with Hungary, where much of the best paprika is produced today. The first pepper plants arrived in Hungary in the 17th century. Some believe that ethnic groups who were fleeing north from the Turks introduced the peppers to the Balkans. Paprika became commonly used in Hungary by the end of the 18th century. Two towns in Hungary (Szeged and Kalosca) competed against each other for the title of Paprika capital of Hungary.

In the 19th century two Hungarian brothers received awards for the quality of their ground paprika. The Palfy brothers introduced semisweet paprika by removing the stalks and seeds from the pods. This removed the capsaicin which gives the spice its heat. The French chef Escoffier introduced the spice to western European cuisine. He brought the spice in 1879 from Szeged on the river to Monte Carlo. A Hungarian scientist Dr. Szent Gyorgyi won a Nobel Prize in 1937 concerning his work with paprika pepper pods and Vitamin C research. Paprika peppers have seven times as much Vitamin C as oranges.
By http://www.foodreference.com/html/artpaprika.html

 
Sausage Balls With Dip
Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
3 cups all purpose baking mix
1 pound ground sausage
3 cups cheddar cheese, finely shredded
1 tablespoon paprika
1 tablespoon black pepper

Directions:
Preheat oven 425. Mix all ingredients well, it's best to use your clean hands. Form into 1 inch balls. Place the balls on the baking sheet. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes, or until golden. Turn balls halfway through cooking. Serve with dip. Enjoy!

Dip:
3/4 cup mayo
1 tablespoon spicy mustard
2 tablespoons horseradish
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
juice from 1 small lime

Mix all ingredients together. Serve with sausage balls. Store leftovers in air tight container and chill. Enjoy!



38 comments:

  1. I've never had these with a sauce...sounds really tasty.

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  2. This is a great party food. And the kids will like it too.

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  3. Sounds great! I love that there is a dip you can never go wrong with a dip.

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  4. I love paprika. My favorite use for it is topping potatoes. It looks so nice and adds a little kick.
    I really want to find some top quality paprika. Maybe Spice Sage?

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  5. The dip sounds delicious, I usually just use ketchup or chilli sauce:P The sausage balls look mighty good too!

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  6. Great recipe for a party! I never thought of making a dip to go with sausage balls but that would be awesome! I am totally bookmarking this! Thanks :)

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  7. Hey everyone, thank you. Your comments mean a lot to me.

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  8. I've never used that sauce on my sausage balls, but it looks amazing! Also - believe it or not - I've not used paprika in them, either...but I will next time! Thanks!

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  9. Christine...I have never tried making sausage balls...yours looks so good and you have inspired me to try this out :) Thanks for sharing the recipe and I used paprika in most of my bakes besides potato...a great spice I cannot do without :)

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  10. Paprika, both the spicy and mild hungarian versions, hold a special place in my pantry, even though I cook more Korean food than Hungarian food.

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  11. Hi Tamar 1973, I'm like you, paprika has a special place in my pantry. I make sure I'm never with out it. Thanks for stopping by.

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  12. Hi Elin, I think you will like the sausage balls. The children will love it.

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  13. I have never tried sausage balls! Looks really tempting!! Yes, this looks like a great savory for kids!

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  14. I love Hungarian Sweet paprika, especially in stews, sauces or even soups..
    Wonderful recipe, will try this for sure..I think my family will enjoy it very much!

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  15. This sounds gorgeous!! And I love the dip :)

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  16. For some reason it seems like I am always buying paprika. I guess I have a lot of recipes including that. I really like sausage balls and your version with paprika sounds good. I have bookmarked to make sometime in the future-Yummy appetizer-especially with the dip!

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  17. These look so cute and delicious! I love the idea of having little sausage bites!

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  18. I love paprika!!! YUM these look great for a party.

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  19. Christine, Love sausage, love sausage balls, love cheese and I love spice. Can't miss with these snacks! Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

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  20. I've never had sausage balls with sauce but I love the idea. Will be making these soon!

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  21. Great party food :P.
    I am using a lot of paprika. It is one of my favorite spices. It is specially good in soups.

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  22. Yum! Sausage is one of my favorite things! With this dip they sound delicious!

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  23. OMG I want one right now. I've never seen this recipe. Great facts on Paprika. Makes me want some Chicken Paprika ASAP

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  24. wow, I love that spicy ah, Ican this with my special someone.

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  25. I just love the way paprika flavours and colours dishes. I love its warm and earthy taste. This is a very nice and easy dish.

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  26. Oh Christine, this brings back memories, I love sausage balls. I will have to make them next time with your dip.

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  27. Paprika is the best! I cook a lot with paprika, and I love the smoked one (Spanish). Interesting recipe.

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  28. I love Paprika, use it in so many dishes. lol! This recipe looks so good Christine!! Never would've thought to do this but now I'm just drooling!

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  29. My hubby and I would both love this. Thanks for the post and easy to make and sure enjoyable. Happy Cooking Andi thewednesdaybaker.blogspot.com

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  30. Christine- We have several types of paprika in our our pantry, so here is another recipe to use them. Your sausage balls look so good, especially with the dip. What type of paprika did you use in your recipe, smoky, sweet, hot?

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  31. Paprika is literally my favourite spice and i sadly dont get to use it enough! I will never forget my dads wonderful paprika laced goulash he used to make, truly delicious. Can only imagine how scrummy these are! :)

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  32. Hi Becky, nice to see you. I used the regular paprika from Kroger.

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