Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Pesto

Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Pesto is a sauce originating in Genoa in the Liguria region of northern Italy, and traditionally consists of crushed garlic, basil and nuts blended with olive oil and cheese. The name is the contracted past participle of the Genoese word pesta, which means to pound, to crush, in reference to the original method of preparation, with marble mortar and wooden pestle. Nowadays, however, the ingredients in pesto are not "pounded" but "ground" with a circular motion of the pestle in the mortar. This same Latin root through Old French also gave rise to the English word pestle.

The ancient Romans ate a cheese spread called moretum, which may sometimes have been made with basil. The herb likely originated in North Africa, however, it was first domesticated in India. Basil took the firmest root in the regions of Liguria, Italy and Provence, France. The Ligurians around Genoa took the dish and adapted it, using a combination of basil, crushed garlic, grated hard cheese (a mix of parmigiano-reggiano and pecorino or just one of the two), and pine nuts with a little olive oil to form pesto. In French Provence, the dish evolved into the modern pistou, a combination of basil, parsley, crushed garlic, and grated cheese (optional). However, pine nuts are not included.

In 1944, The New York Times mentioned an imported canned pesto paste. In 1946, Sunset magazine published a pesto recipe by Angelo Pellegrini. Pesto did not become popular in North America until the 1980s and 1990s.
By http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesto

Pesto
Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
2 cups parsley
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 cup pine nuts
1/4 cup walnuts, chopped
pinch salt and pepper
1/2 cup olive oil

Directions:
In a blender, add garlic, pine nuts, walnuts, parsley, salt and pepper, and blend until finely chopped. Add olive oil, and blend until mixture becomes creamy. Enjoy!



38 comments:

  1. We must be on the same wave length, I recently was looking all over for pine nuts to make pesto but could not find them. End result was store bought pesto, which I am sure did not taste near as good as yours. Nothing beats fresh ingredients.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Tina, I bought my pine nuts at Kroger.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Interesting that you made this with parsley I have only ever made it with basil.This looks like it would be very good with many fish dishes

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love pesto! It is great to mix up the greens. I put spinach, parsley and basil in mine! Helps get a tiny bit more veggies in people :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. What an interesting sory about pesto! This is one of my favorite condiments. I love it in the summer when I can grow the basil myself in the summer and make my own!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Creatwithmom, I am happy to accept the award. Thank you so much. I'm doing my happy dance now. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your pesto looks delicious. There are so many pesto recipes, and all equally delicious I,m surw.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The only pine nuts I could find were in a TEENY TINY bag in the baking isle. They wanted 5 bucks for the little bag and for the amount of basil we had I needed more than one. I'm on a hunt for cheap pine nuts! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oooh...I LOVE pesto! Pretty cool that there was at one time a CANNED pesto - but home made is best!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Pesto is one of my most favorite sauces.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I've never tried pesto made with parsley! What a great twist! : )

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Michelle, pine nuts are very expensive. I normally don't buy pine nuts just because they are so expensive. I went on a hunt with you, here is what I found on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Candy-Express-1LB-PINE-NUTS/dp/B0038KDV96, that's a good deal, considering how high they are.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great recipe - especially good for dinner in a flash! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  14. One of my favorite things in all the world to eat! I love that color!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hello Christine and thank you for passing by my blog and following it. I am your follower too :)
    I like very much the addition of walnuts in your pesto. Have a nice day.
    Brindusa@ Cooking with my soul

    ReplyDelete
  16. Great history re: the pesto. Love your edition with the walnuts, as well. When I don't have pine nuts on hand, I just use all walnuts, which works fine.
    Tnaks for sharing, Christine:D

    ReplyDelete
  17. Christine, pesto is my favourite! Yours sounds incredibly good. Thanks so much for sharing.
    Hope you're having a great day.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  18. Very interesting. Pesto with parsley. Great idea

    ReplyDelete
  19. Christine, I just love pesto. It complements so many dishes if one thinks outside of the box... Thanks for the history lesson as well. Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love pesto, though I have grown a tad nervous about pinenuts ever since I got pine mouth. I miss them : ( It's fun to experiment with different herbs for it like this - arugula is great too.

    ReplyDelete
  21. i love pesto! love adding walnuts with pinenuts too :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Trix, A small minority of pine nuts cultivated in China can cause taste disturbances, lasting between few days to maximal a week after consumption. A bitter, metallic taste is described. Though unpleasant, there are no lasting effects. This phenomenon was first described in a scientific paper in 2001, Some publications have made reference to this phenomenon as "pine mouth". The Nestle Research Centre has hypothesized that a particular species of Chinese pine nuts, Pinus armandii, is the cause of the problem. The suspect species of pine nuts are smaller, duller, and more rounded than typical pine nuts. This finding has recently been confirmed. In 1998 the FAO published a list of edible tree nuts, containing 29 species of pine nuts that are regularly consumed somewhere in the world and the aforementioned Chinese pine species were not included. Metallic taste disturbance, known as metallogeusia, is typically reported 1–3 days after ingestion, being worse on day 2 and lasting typically up to 2 weeks. Cases are self-limited and resolve without treatment Moller has postulated an hypothesis that could explain why the bitter taste appears several days after ingestion and lasts for as long. A well known physiological process known as enterohepatic recirculation (EHR) could play a key role in the development of PNS.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I ussually buy pesto and then leave it in the fridge for 4 monthsa nd it goes bad, haha. But maybe if I made it I'd use it right up? That's my logic. Looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Christine, thanks for following! I've been following you from way back and always enjoy reading the history behind your recipes. Pesto is always a summer favorite of mine. Can't wait to make some soon when my basil plants are at their peak. Walnuts are nice alternative to pine nuts especially when their price goes up. But I do love the flavor of pine nuts!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi Lin Ann, I've been on your blog before, always a pleasure to visit you, but today I notice I didn't sign into Google friend connect, not sure why. I guess I'm getting slow in my old age. ~Giggle~

    ReplyDelete
  26. I love making pesto too! Love your version of it!!

    ReplyDelete
  27. What a lovely pesto recipe! Beautiuful color too! I didn't know the history about pesto and thanks for educating me. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  28. Pesto is SO GOOD! I can't believe it wasn't popular in the USA until the 80's or 90's...and I have never seen it made with parsley OR with walnuts, so I am excited to give this a try. What do you normally use your pesto on? I like it with pasta and on bread, but curious if anyone else has some great ideas.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Kelsey, I normally use pesto on, pasta, toast, sandwich, fish.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Pesto is one of my favorite sauces...it's so versatile.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Love pesto and this is looks so healthy and delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I've always used either pine nuts or walnuts in pesto...never together...must try your version!

    ReplyDelete

Why not leave a comment or a suggestion? Be the first to leave a comment.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...