Monday, July 11, 2011

Creamy Pork Noodle Soup

Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Over time, the Dutch oven used in the American colonies began to change. The pot became shallower and legs were added to hold the oven above the coals. A flange was added to the lid to keep the coals on the lid and out of the food.

The cast-iron cookware was loved by colonists and settlers because of its versatility and durability. It could be used for boiling, baking, stews, frying, roasting, and just about any other use. The ovens were so valuable that wills in the 18th and 19th centuries frequently spelled out the desired inheritor of the cast iron cookware. For example, Mary Ball Washington (mother of President George Washington) specified in her will, dated 20 May 1788, that one-half of her "iron kitchen furniture" should go to her grandson, Fielding Lewis, and the other half to Betty Carter, a granddaughter. Several Dutch ovens were among Mary’s “iron kitchen furniture.

When the young American country began to spread westward across the North American continent, so did the Dutch oven. A Dutch oven was among the gear Lewis and Clark carried when they explored the great American Northwest in 1804–1806. The pioneers who settled the American West also took along their Dutch ovens. In fact, a statue raised to honor the Mormon handcart companies who entered Utah’s Salt Lake Valley in the 1850s proudly displays a Dutch oven hanging from the front of the handcart. The Dutch oven is also the official state cooking pot of Utah.

Mountain men exploring the great American frontier used Dutch ovens into the late 19th century. Dutch oven cooking was also prominent among those who took part in the western cattle drives that lasted from the mid-19th century into the early 20th century.

Modern Dutch ovens designed for use on the cooktop or in the oven are typically smooth-bottomed. Two French manufacturers of enameled Dutch ovens, Le Creuset and Le Chasseur, refer to their ovens as "French ovens", or in the UK as "casserole dishes". Some older styles, such as the unglazed ovens by Lodge, Griswold, CampChef, and Wagner, retain the bale handle, while others, such as the enameled versions by Staub, Sante, and le Creuset, have two loop handles. Modern ovens may also be made of thick cast aluminum or ceramic.
By http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_oven#American_history

Creamy Pork Noodle Soup
Copyright 2011 Christine's Pantry. All rights reserved.

Ingredients:
1 pound ground pork
1 onion, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon garlic, minced
2 (4 oz) can mushrooms, drained
2 cups uncooked egg noodles
5 cups chicken broth
1 (8 oz) sour cream
2 heaping tablespoons ketchup

Directions:
In a dutch oven, add olive oil and butter, heat over medium high heat. Add pork, onions, garlic, salt and pepper. Breaking meat up as it cooks. Cook pork until no longer pink. Add mushrooms, chicken broth, ketchup and noodles. Stir well. Bring to boil, then reduce heat to simmer. Simmer for 30 minutes. After soup has been cooking for 27 minutes, add sour cream. Stir well. Serve warm. Enjoy!



28 comments:

  1. I love using my Dutch oven. You can make so many delicious dishes in it. Its a favorite come winter time.

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  2. This sounds really interesting Christine. I love new ways to use ground pork and I definitely love anything with the word creamy in the title hehe

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  3. I have heard of Dutch ovens but never had a concrete concept of how they actually work. Now you have an actual recipe to use w/ this type of cooker! Do you have a particular brand that you can recommend?

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  4. Hi Steve, I recommend the Lodge Logic Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Dutch Oven.

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  5. noodle soup is so very comforting.. this looks lovely creamy :)

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  6. Niiiiice! Creamy pork. That sounds incredible. Well done!

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  7. Tasty noodles soup, great winter warmer as well as a simple meal. Love it.

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  8. Hi Christine! Once again a great history! I look forward to your posts - they are SO interesting! I have a LeCreuset dutch oven, but I love my cast iron pans. I have 4 of them and they are heritage pieces .

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  9. what a comfortin stew! Love your post! what a great history lesson!

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  10. This is a meal my family would devour! Ill be making this one in the very near future!

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  11. Sounds really yummy! I love pork noodle soup... Great comfort food! Thanks for sharing :)

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  12. I am with Ann, I love reading your posts and the history behind everything. I have 2 dutch ovens as I like having different sizes. I got lucky and got them for 65 percent off so was worth it. I still would like the Le Creuset one though,lol. I do not have a cast iron pan though but think it is next on my list. This recipe is lovely. My fam would love it. Well except the warden who does not like meat very much. But she would love the noodles.

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  13. Nice one Christine, love that color after done with the cooking. I don't cook pork at home since my hubby is pork free but do enjoy it with friends at eateries.

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  14. Hey everyone, thanks for all the nice comments. They make me happy.

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  15. Egg noodles and pork, great recipe. I will add this to my soup recipes, it is a nice change of pace from chicken noodle soup! Thanks for sharing.

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  16. This is something quite unusual...I need to try it!

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  17. I have never thought of using pork in soup, don't really know why. Thanks for making me think and the inspiration to try something different!

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  18. I love my le creuset. Best thing for stews and braises. I know it is gonna outlive me. Lovely, hearty soup.

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  19. This looks so delicious! Love it! :)

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  20. Love the history you bring in your posts. Thanks for sharing Christine. Great noodle soup!

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  21. Mmmm..pork noodle soup. I have never heard of it before! Looks like I am missing out! Yummy! :D

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  22. What a great post! So good to know about the venerable Dutch Oven. I love mine and it is several generations old. It's so well seasoned that nothing ever sticks. Great to be foodie friends.

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  23. Looks and sounds delicious. Andi thewednesdaybaker

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  24. Looks and sounds very tasty. caroline

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  25. I am really looking to get a dutch oven, and cast iron. But being that I'm living in a tight apt, with a itty bitty kitchen, hubby will kill me, if I got anything for the kitchen. This soup looks so comforting! I would love to try it! =]

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  26. Hi Juju, you don't need a dutch oven to cook this soup. Any large pot you have would work just fine. I don't want anyone to have to go out and buy an item for the kitchen just to make one of my recipes.

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  27. What a comforting dish! I love any excuse to use my Dutch Oven!

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  28. That soup looks amazing..what a great recipe, and I think my kids would love it especially on a colder days! Thanks for sharing!!!

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